Topics

Magazines

America’s voice for population stabilization

Population Connection magazine is our quarterly publication for Population Connection members (we also send each issue to every member of Congress and to about 3,000 public and university libraries). If you’d like to subscribe, please make your gift of $25 or more by clicking below.

March 2021

March 15, 2021 | Magazines

On January 20, 2021, President Joseph R. Biden and Vice President Kamala D. Harris were sworn into office. The Trump era is officially over, and though repairing the damage remains a herculean task, the new administration wasted no time in getting started. Cover image: Melvine Ouyo, a Nairobi-based reproductive health…...

Read More

December 2020

December 14, 2020 | Magazines

Population growth in fire-prone states is responsible for sprawling development into areas that should never have been inhabited by people. Our buildings create kindling for wildfires, making even those that start through no fault of our own—each year, tens of thousands of fires are started by lightening strikes—worse. And once…...

Read More

September 2020

August 31, 2020 | Magazines

As anyone from high-fertility regions can confirm, population concerns are very real at the national, local, and even household level. In this issue, we hear from people who know from firsthand experience just how important it is to stabilize population in their home countries. Cover image: Dr. Leticia Adelaide Appiah,…...

Read More

June 2020

June 1, 2020 | Magazines

This issue of Population Connection magazine explores the origins of the Covid-19 outbreak, which, at press time, was already responsible for killing over 200,000 people worldwide. Basically, it comes down to the fact that we’ve treated animals terribly for all time, and every now and then it bites us. This…...

Read More

March 2020

March 2, 2020 | Magazines

Nearly half (44 percent) of women in Nepal have an unmet need for family planning. That is, they do not want to become pregnant in the next two years (20 percent of women with unmet need) or ever again (80 percent), but are not using modern contraception. The government of…...

Read More